Validation

Validation

Validate form submissions using the AJAX framework.

Validating forms checks the user input against a set of predefined rules.

# Performing Validation

To enable validation features, include the data-request-validate attribute on a HTML form tag. The following is a minimal example of form validation.

<form data-request="onSubmit" data-request-validate>
    <div>
        <label>Name</label>
        <input name="name" />
    </div>

    <button data-attach-loading>
        Submit
    </button>
</form>

Inside your AJAX handler, you may throw a validation exception using the ValidationException class to make a field invalid. The supplied array (first argument) should use field names for the keys and the error messages for the values.

function onSubmit()
{
    if (!post('name')) {
        throw new ValidationException(['name' => 'You must give a name!']);
    }
}

When the AJAX framework encounters the ValidationException, it will automatically focus the first invalid field and display error messages, if configured.

# Validating a Single Field

In some cases you may want to validate a single field when the value changes. By including the data-track-input attribute alongside the data-request attribute, the AJAX framework will submit a request when a user types something in to the field.

<form data-request-validate>
    <div>
        <label>Username</label>
        <input name="username" data-request="onCheckUsername" data-track-input />
    </div>
</form>

A dedicated AJAX handler can be used to validate the field. If no exception is thrown, it can be considered valid.

function onCheckUsername()
{
    if (true) {
        throw new ValidationException(['username' => 'Username is taken!']);
    }
}

# Using the Validation Service

View the Validation article to learn about the different rules you can use here.

For more complex validation, you may use the Request facade to apply rules to the user input in bulk. The validate method performs validation using the specified rules (first argument), and returns the attributes and values that were validated as an array. It also throws a ValidationException if the validation fails.

function onSubmit()
{
    $data = Request::validate([
        'name' => 'required',
        'email' => 'required|email',
    ]);

    // The code will not reach here if validation fails

    Flash::success('Jobs done!');
}

# Custom Error Messages & Attributes

To change the deafult validation messages, you may pass custom messages to the validate method. The keys in the messages array (third argument) follow the attribute.rule format.

$messages = [
    'email.required' => 'Please type something for the email...',
    'email.email' => 'That email is not an email...!'
];

$data = Request::validate($rules, $messages);

If you want to keep the default validation messages, and only change the :attribute name used, pass custom attributes as an array (fourth argument).

$attributeNames = [
    'email' => 'e-mail address'
];

$data = Request::validate($rules, [], $attributeNames);

# Displaying Error Messages

Inside the form, you may display the first error message by using the data-validate-error attribute on a container element. The content inside the container will be set to the error message and the element will be made visible.

<div data-validate-error></div>

To display multiple error messages, include an element with the data-message attribute. In this example the paragraph tag will be duplicated and set with content for each message that exists.

<div class="alert alert-danger" data-validate-error>
    <p data-message></p>
</div>

# Displaying Errors with Fields

If you prefer to show validation messages for individual fields, define an element that uses the data-validate-for attribute, passing the field name as the value.

<!-- Input field -->
<input name="phone" />

<!-- Validation message for the field -->
<div data-validate-for="phone"></div>

If the element is left empty, it will be populated with the validation text from the server. Otherwise you can specify any text you like and it will be displayed instead.

<div data-validate-for="phone">
    Oops.. phone number is invalid!
</div>

# Working with JavaScript

To implement custom functionality for the error messages, hook into the ajax:invalid-field event to display the field and ajax:promise to reset the form on a new submission. The JavaScript events used are found in the AJAX JavaScript API.

addEventListener('ajax:invalid-field', function(event) {
    const { element, fieldName, errorMsg, isFirst } = event.detail;
    element.classList.add('has-error');
});

addEventListener('ajax:promise', function(event) {
    event.target.closest('form').querySelectorAll('.has-error').forEach(function(el) {
        el.classList.remove('has-error');
    });
});

# Complete Usage Example

Below is a complete example of form validation. It calls the onSubmitForm event handler that triggers a loading submit button, performs validation on the form fields, then displays a successful flash message.

The data-request-flash attribute is used to enable flash messages for successful messages and display the validation message. The data-attach-loading attribute is used to display a loading indicator and prevent double submissions from misclicks.

<form
    data-request="onSubmitForm"
    data-request-validate
    data-request-flash="success">
    <div>
        <label>Username</label>
        <input name="username"
            data-request="onCheckUsername"
            data-track-input
            data-attach-loading />
        <span data-validate-for="username"></span>
    </div>

    <div>
        <label>Email</label>
        <input name="email" />
        <span data-validate-for="email"></span>
    </div>

    <button data-attach-loading>
        Submit
    </button>

    <div class="alert alert-danger" data-validate-error>
        <p data-message></p>
    </div>
</form>

The onSubmitForm AJAX event handler looks at the POST data sent by the client and applies some rules to the validator. If the validation fails, a ValidationException is thrown, otherwise a Flash::success message is returned.

The onCheckUsername checks to see if a username is available, currently hard-coded to prevent names admin and jeff from being entered. It is checked twice, when the user types something in and when the user submits the form.

function onSubmitForm()
{
    $data = Request::validate([
        'username' => 'required',
        'email' => 'required|email',
    ]);

    $this->onCheckUsername();

    Flash::success('Jobs done!');
}

function onCheckUsername()
{
    $username = strtolower(trim(post('username')));
    $isTaken = in_array($username, ['admin', 'jeff']);

    if ($isTaken) {
        throw new ValidationException(['username' => 'Username is taken!']);
    }
}

# See Also